Essays, Yoga

Yoga Teacher Training: First Impressions

 

I’ve been practicing yoga with regularity for the past two years, but I hadn’t considered teacher training because I never thought of myself as a teacher (of any kind). I also didn’t think that I would be physically capable. There are several poses I still can’t get into, whether it’s a lack of strength or a mental barrier. The whole proposition intimidated me, and yet I decided to do it anyway. I’m in Week 3, training at theย Yoga Bliss studio, which is filled with amazing yogis that follow all the limbs of yoga, not just the physical ones. I’m thankful I found them, and that I’m sharing a class with excellent humans who are just as eager to learn and grow.

So far, I’ve been surprised by how quickly it’s had a positive effect on my yoga practice. The incredible thing about mindfulness is it can start working immediately, all that’s needed is practice! I feel reinvigorated and have already had a couple of epiphanies.

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Essays

Rod Serling’s Social Commentary in ‘The Twilight Zone’

I’ve been digging through my archives and found this awesome college paper about The Twilight Zone! The show is a childhood favorite, so I was incredibly happy when I had the opportunity to write about it in a film & TV class focused on the fifties and sixties. This particular paper centers around two episodes in which Rod Serling’s biting social commentary on then present-day anxieties are particularly visible. Enjoy!

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Essays

Tales of a Tween Nothing

I’m not a hoarder, but I have hoarding tendencies. For years I dragged around the debris of my former life from apartment to apartment. I packed the detritus into closets and garages, boxes and bags. Occasionally, I’d dip into the memories and laugh or cry myself to sleep. The junk brought me comfort somehow, it was the only witness to the things I had lived through or the people I ‘d met in my life.

That all began to change when I met my now husband. We’ve been together almost ten years now, and he’s taught me to simplify and live a more minimalist lifestyle. I’ve learned that you can appreciate the past without having to drag around a bunch of stuff. Subsequently, I’ve managed to pare down my mementos from closetfuls to a single box. That means I’ve had to be selective about what I kept and what I tossed.

The most notable item to make the cut was the only diary I’ve ever kept in my whole entire life.ย The notebook was part of an Easter basket my sister had given to me. The journal covers the span of five years from March 31, 1991, to September 9, 1996; I went from a nine-year-old to a fourteen-year-old. The entries begin pretty tamely, describing what I ate that day or what I watched, but then things heat up with my detailed descriptions of who I was crushing on at the moment. Even then I was a creature of habit, and after reading hundreds of pages of adolescent angst, a few themes arose as I read.

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Bookworm, Essays

The Surprisingly Sexy Imagery in ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’

[This has been sitting in my drafts folder so long that The Handmaid’s Tale is largely irrelevant now. Realizing this made me want to just delete it, but it was mostly complete so I just hunkered down and finished the damn thing. Bear with me, one day I’ll learn to write quickly enough for the news cycle.]

When I was done reading Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale (and done watching the Hulu Original series) I was left with mixed emotions. On the one hand, the story is a cautionary tale of what can happen when you let religious white men take over, but on the other hand, it’s also peak white feminism; it’s not inclusive of women of color (WOC). To Hulu’s credit, they were diverse in the casting of the TV show, and their adaptation was great, but I don’t think they addressed race any better than the book did.

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